Once I Sat Upon a Promontory (Detail)   ©  111 cm high x 50 cm wide  Unique   

Once I Sat Upon a Promontory (Detail)   ©

111 cm high x 50 cm wide

Unique

 

 In much of this work Diamantopoulo plays with the irony of the ‘plinth-as- hero’.  “With the advent of the Fourth Plinth at Trafalgar Square, the plinth has re- established itself in the mind of the contemporary artist, when in recent decades it was so easily snubbed as a relic of a bygone statuary art form.  “For me, it was never out of place in the gallery or street and I find it amusing that it is still happily underpinning many figurative and conceptual art forms. “  Here, the plinth, pillar or mount becomes the story, an essential part of the message.

In much of this work Diamantopoulo plays with the irony of the ‘plinth-as- hero’.

“With the advent of the Fourth Plinth at Trafalgar Square, the plinth has re- established itself in the mind of the contemporary artist, when in recent decades it was so easily snubbed as a relic of a bygone statuary art form.

“For me, it was never out of place in the gallery or street and I find it amusing that it is still happily underpinning many figurative and conceptual art forms. “

Here, the plinth, pillar or mount becomes the story, an essential part of the message.

 Once I Sat Upon a Promontory ll   ©  115 cm high x 50 cm wide  Unique

Once I Sat Upon a Promontory ll   ©

115 cm high x 50 cm wide

Unique

 “The notion of putting a Bottom in repose, on a pedestal appealed to my sense of the absurd – making the misplaced à propos and credible.”  This work alludes to Oberon’s speech to Puck in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream where Bottom’s fate is sealed.  Chronologically, of course, the small- headed Tang Horse doesn’t belong in this story, though somehow, it sits well together.

“The notion of putting a Bottom in repose, on a pedestal appealed to my sense of the absurd – making the misplaced à propos and credible.”

This work alludes to Oberon’s speech to Puck in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream where Bottom’s fate is sealed.

Chronologically, of course, the small- headed Tang Horse doesn’t belong in this story, though somehow, it sits well together.

 Tang Blue   ©  118 cm high x 51 cm wide  Unique  Diamantopoulo has taken the basic long-necked Tang Horse form and counter-balanced it, more or less exactly, with an atypical extended tail so that it stands precariously like a vase on a plinth – yet seems perfectly composed in the restful sense.  The horse and rider are blue - in the R&B sense.   

Tang Blue   ©

118 cm high x 51 cm wide

Unique

Diamantopoulo has taken the basic long-necked Tang Horse form and counter-balanced it, more or less exactly, with an atypical extended tail so that it stands precariously like a vase on a plinth – yet seems perfectly composed in the restful sense.

The horse and rider are blue - in the R&B sense.

 

 (Detail) Tang Blue   ©

(Detail) Tang Blue   ©

 Chloros   ©  126 cm high x 50 cm wide  Unique  Chlorus - Greek lexicon for pale green. The piece takes its energy from a Chinese dynamic, though paradoxically it is hauntingly still.  The horse’s head is diminutive - a classical technique which enhances presence in the body.  Though it is not apparent from this angle, viewed face-on, in both Tang Blue and this sculpture, the figure’s head is pared down to a mere slice, sitting on the shoulders like a penny - perhaps a gradual path to abstraction.

Chloros   ©

126 cm high x 50 cm wide

Unique

Chlorus - Greek lexicon for pale green. The piece takes its energy from a Chinese dynamic, though paradoxically it is hauntingly still.

The horse’s head is diminutive - a classical technique which enhances presence in the body.

Though it is not apparent from this angle, viewed face-on, in both Tang Blue and this sculpture, the figure’s head is pared down to a mere slice, sitting on the shoulders like a penny - perhaps a gradual path to abstraction.

 Baroque and Berserque   ©  160 cm high x 69 cm wide  Unique  Embellished and extravagant in style in the baroque sense, but equally sketchy and free - a barmy concoction of creatures: avian, equine and seemingly cloven-hoofed.  Perfectly balanced on a pedestal, but equally off-his-rocker, this is a cock- eyed horse with a precocious, come- hither haunch.  A guardian of the gates of Bedlam perhaps.  Roy Harper fans will recognise the modified title (sic) from an album of the same name.

Baroque and Berserque   ©

160 cm high x 69 cm wide

Unique

Embellished and extravagant in style in the baroque sense, but equally sketchy and free - a barmy concoction of creatures: avian, equine and seemingly cloven-hoofed.

Perfectly balanced on a pedestal, but equally off-his-rocker, this is a cock- eyed horse with a precocious, come- hither haunch.

A guardian of the gates of Bedlam perhaps.

Roy Harper fans will recognise the modified title (sic) from an album of the same name.

 Baroque and Berserque (Detail)   ©

Baroque and Berserque (Detail)   ©

 Moondancer   ©  77 cm high x 38 cm wide  Unique  A turbaned head and mane has been added to this Chinese-Moghul crossbreed to create a vessel-of-a- horse with two handles.  “The Pasha’s Delight” was in my mind when making this tail-eating horse. High-spirited and corpulent, prancing improbably on a half moon, he exudes exoticism.

Moondancer   ©

77 cm high x 38 cm wide

Unique

A turbaned head and mane has been added to this Chinese-Moghul crossbreed to create a vessel-of-a- horse with two handles.

“The Pasha’s Delight” was in my mind when making this tail-eating horse. High-spirited and corpulent, prancing improbably on a half moon, he exudes exoticism.

 Moondancer ll   ©  95.5 cm high x 67 cm wide  Unique

Moondancer ll   ©

95.5 cm high x 67 cm wide

Unique

 Bucephalus   ©  79 cm high x 94 cm wide  Unique  Subverting the concept of the horse as the object being mounted - it is the horse that is now mounted on a pedestal or, as in this case, a pedestal masquerading as a vessel.  The horse as passenger and not as conveyor and the vessel as a means of bearing the noble creature aloft, is a recurring theme.  Here, Bucephalus, Alexander the Great’s favourite horse, travels down the Nile on a royal, reed, horse- barge.  It is no accident that the barge also mimics a blacksmith’s anvil. The ‘anvil’ anchors the piece, accentuating its gravitas whilst negating any sense of floatation.

Bucephalus   ©

79 cm high x 94 cm wide

Unique

Subverting the concept of the horse as the object being mounted - it is the horse that is now mounted on a pedestal or, as in this case, a pedestal masquerading as a vessel.

The horse as passenger and not as conveyor and the vessel as a means of bearing the noble creature aloft, is a recurring theme.

Here, Bucephalus, Alexander the Great’s favourite horse, travels down the Nile on a royal, reed, horse- barge.

It is no accident that the barge also mimics a blacksmith’s anvil.
The ‘anvil’ anchors the piece, accentuating its gravitas whilst negating any sense of floatation.

 Equuleus   ©  96 cm high x 134 cm wide  Unique  Equuleus (Little Horse) perhaps representing the bringer of war.  This creature is poised for power, seemingly bearing a helmet or plating of some kind - a fearful and ancient deliverance upon some unsuspecting present-day shore.  Diamantopoulo deliberately launches classical or antiquarian themes or forms into the contemporary space in order to provoke.  A thing of beauty can deliver a disturbing sub- text with all the more force.   

Equuleus   ©

96 cm high x 134 cm wide

Unique

Equuleus (Little Horse) perhaps representing the bringer of war.

This creature is poised for power, seemingly bearing a helmet or plating of some kind - a fearful and ancient deliverance upon some unsuspecting present-day shore.

Diamantopoulo deliberately launches classical or antiquarian themes or forms into the contemporary space in order to provoke.

A thing of beauty can deliver a disturbing sub- text with all the more force.

 

 King Creole   ©  87 cm high x 66 cm wide  Unique  Flying over a Norse-like vessel, a Celtic war-horse – simple, like an iron-age chalk downs carving, gallops with a standing rider on board.  The rider is based on the cave scratching of an even earlier art form to become a Neolithic King with an Elvis quiff or a primitive mouth.  The weathervane arms point east and west and echo the Christian cross.

King Creole   ©

87 cm high x 66 cm wide

Unique

Flying over a Norse-like vessel, a Celtic war-horse – simple, like an iron-age chalk downs carving, gallops with a standing rider on board.

The rider is based on the cave scratching of an even earlier art form to become a Neolithic King with an Elvis quiff or a primitive mouth.

The weathervane arms point east and west and echo the Christian cross.

 Seahorse   ©  79 cm high x 54 cm wide  Unique  A vessel with a horse-head prow and a horse-legged stand; on board, six rowers of Chinese origin.  Understated in this eclectic mix are the the horsetail rudder and the heart-shaped helmets that are disguised, wind-up toy keys.  This piece implies deception, combining the charm of a mechanical toy with the presence of an instrument of plunder. A variation on a Greek offering.

Seahorse   ©

79 cm high x 54 cm wide

Unique

A vessel with a horse-head prow and a horse-legged stand; on board, six rowers of Chinese origin.

Understated in this eclectic mix are the the horsetail rudder and the heart-shaped helmets that are disguised, wind-up toy keys.

This piece implies deception, combining the charm of a mechanical toy with the presence of an instrument of plunder. A variation on a Greek offering.

 The Happy Han   ©  74 cm high x 38 cm wide  Unique  “I wanted to simplify the horse form here. The result is easy on the eye – and jolly. Hence the name.”

The Happy Han   ©

74 cm high x 38 cm wide

Unique

“I wanted to simplify the horse form here. The result is easy on the eye – and jolly. Hence the name.”

 Once I Sat Upon a Promontory (Detail)   ©  111 cm high x 50 cm wide  Unique   
 In much of this work Diamantopoulo plays with the irony of the ‘plinth-as- hero’.  “With the advent of the Fourth Plinth at Trafalgar Square, the plinth has re- established itself in the mind of the contemporary artist, when in recent decades it was so easily snubbed as a relic of a bygone statuary art form.  “For me, it was never out of place in the gallery or street and I find it amusing that it is still happily underpinning many figurative and conceptual art forms. “  Here, the plinth, pillar or mount becomes the story, an essential part of the message.
 Once I Sat Upon a Promontory ll   ©  115 cm high x 50 cm wide  Unique
 “The notion of putting a Bottom in repose, on a pedestal appealed to my sense of the absurd – making the misplaced à propos and credible.”  This work alludes to Oberon’s speech to Puck in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream where Bottom’s fate is sealed.  Chronologically, of course, the small- headed Tang Horse doesn’t belong in this story, though somehow, it sits well together.
 Tang Blue   ©  118 cm high x 51 cm wide  Unique  Diamantopoulo has taken the basic long-necked Tang Horse form and counter-balanced it, more or less exactly, with an atypical extended tail so that it stands precariously like a vase on a plinth – yet seems perfectly composed in the restful sense.  The horse and rider are blue - in the R&B sense.   
 (Detail) Tang Blue   ©
 Chloros   ©  126 cm high x 50 cm wide  Unique  Chlorus - Greek lexicon for pale green. The piece takes its energy from a Chinese dynamic, though paradoxically it is hauntingly still.  The horse’s head is diminutive - a classical technique which enhances presence in the body.  Though it is not apparent from this angle, viewed face-on, in both Tang Blue and this sculpture, the figure’s head is pared down to a mere slice, sitting on the shoulders like a penny - perhaps a gradual path to abstraction.
 Baroque and Berserque   ©  160 cm high x 69 cm wide  Unique  Embellished and extravagant in style in the baroque sense, but equally sketchy and free - a barmy concoction of creatures: avian, equine and seemingly cloven-hoofed.  Perfectly balanced on a pedestal, but equally off-his-rocker, this is a cock- eyed horse with a precocious, come- hither haunch.  A guardian of the gates of Bedlam perhaps.  Roy Harper fans will recognise the modified title (sic) from an album of the same name.
 Baroque and Berserque (Detail)   ©
 Moondancer   ©  77 cm high x 38 cm wide  Unique  A turbaned head and mane has been added to this Chinese-Moghul crossbreed to create a vessel-of-a- horse with two handles.  “The Pasha’s Delight” was in my mind when making this tail-eating horse. High-spirited and corpulent, prancing improbably on a half moon, he exudes exoticism.
 Moondancer ll   ©  95.5 cm high x 67 cm wide  Unique
 Bucephalus   ©  79 cm high x 94 cm wide  Unique  Subverting the concept of the horse as the object being mounted - it is the horse that is now mounted on a pedestal or, as in this case, a pedestal masquerading as a vessel.  The horse as passenger and not as conveyor and the vessel as a means of bearing the noble creature aloft, is a recurring theme.  Here, Bucephalus, Alexander the Great’s favourite horse, travels down the Nile on a royal, reed, horse- barge.  It is no accident that the barge also mimics a blacksmith’s anvil. The ‘anvil’ anchors the piece, accentuating its gravitas whilst negating any sense of floatation.
 Equuleus   ©  96 cm high x 134 cm wide  Unique  Equuleus (Little Horse) perhaps representing the bringer of war.  This creature is poised for power, seemingly bearing a helmet or plating of some kind - a fearful and ancient deliverance upon some unsuspecting present-day shore.  Diamantopoulo deliberately launches classical or antiquarian themes or forms into the contemporary space in order to provoke.  A thing of beauty can deliver a disturbing sub- text with all the more force.   
 King Creole   ©  87 cm high x 66 cm wide  Unique  Flying over a Norse-like vessel, a Celtic war-horse – simple, like an iron-age chalk downs carving, gallops with a standing rider on board.  The rider is based on the cave scratching of an even earlier art form to become a Neolithic King with an Elvis quiff or a primitive mouth.  The weathervane arms point east and west and echo the Christian cross.
 Seahorse   ©  79 cm high x 54 cm wide  Unique  A vessel with a horse-head prow and a horse-legged stand; on board, six rowers of Chinese origin.  Understated in this eclectic mix are the the horsetail rudder and the heart-shaped helmets that are disguised, wind-up toy keys.  This piece implies deception, combining the charm of a mechanical toy with the presence of an instrument of plunder. A variation on a Greek offering.
 The Happy Han   ©  74 cm high x 38 cm wide  Unique  “I wanted to simplify the horse form here. The result is easy on the eye – and jolly. Hence the name.”

Once I Sat Upon a Promontory (Detail)   ©

111 cm high x 50 cm wide

Unique

 

In much of this work Diamantopoulo plays with the irony of the ‘plinth-as- hero’.

“With the advent of the Fourth Plinth at Trafalgar Square, the plinth has re- established itself in the mind of the contemporary artist, when in recent decades it was so easily snubbed as a relic of a bygone statuary art form.

“For me, it was never out of place in the gallery or street and I find it amusing that it is still happily underpinning many figurative and conceptual art forms. “

Here, the plinth, pillar or mount becomes the story, an essential part of the message.

Once I Sat Upon a Promontory ll   ©

115 cm high x 50 cm wide

Unique

“The notion of putting a Bottom in repose, on a pedestal appealed to my sense of the absurd – making the misplaced à propos and credible.”

This work alludes to Oberon’s speech to Puck in Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream where Bottom’s fate is sealed.

Chronologically, of course, the small- headed Tang Horse doesn’t belong in this story, though somehow, it sits well together.

Tang Blue   ©

118 cm high x 51 cm wide

Unique

Diamantopoulo has taken the basic long-necked Tang Horse form and counter-balanced it, more or less exactly, with an atypical extended tail so that it stands precariously like a vase on a plinth – yet seems perfectly composed in the restful sense.

The horse and rider are blue - in the R&B sense.

 

(Detail) Tang Blue   ©

Chloros   ©

126 cm high x 50 cm wide

Unique

Chlorus - Greek lexicon for pale green. The piece takes its energy from a Chinese dynamic, though paradoxically it is hauntingly still.

The horse’s head is diminutive - a classical technique which enhances presence in the body.

Though it is not apparent from this angle, viewed face-on, in both Tang Blue and this sculpture, the figure’s head is pared down to a mere slice, sitting on the shoulders like a penny - perhaps a gradual path to abstraction.

Baroque and Berserque   ©

160 cm high x 69 cm wide

Unique

Embellished and extravagant in style in the baroque sense, but equally sketchy and free - a barmy concoction of creatures: avian, equine and seemingly cloven-hoofed.

Perfectly balanced on a pedestal, but equally off-his-rocker, this is a cock- eyed horse with a precocious, come- hither haunch.

A guardian of the gates of Bedlam perhaps.

Roy Harper fans will recognise the modified title (sic) from an album of the same name.

Baroque and Berserque (Detail)   ©

Moondancer   ©

77 cm high x 38 cm wide

Unique

A turbaned head and mane has been added to this Chinese-Moghul crossbreed to create a vessel-of-a- horse with two handles.

“The Pasha’s Delight” was in my mind when making this tail-eating horse. High-spirited and corpulent, prancing improbably on a half moon, he exudes exoticism.

Moondancer ll   ©

95.5 cm high x 67 cm wide

Unique

Bucephalus   ©

79 cm high x 94 cm wide

Unique

Subverting the concept of the horse as the object being mounted - it is the horse that is now mounted on a pedestal or, as in this case, a pedestal masquerading as a vessel.

The horse as passenger and not as conveyor and the vessel as a means of bearing the noble creature aloft, is a recurring theme.

Here, Bucephalus, Alexander the Great’s favourite horse, travels down the Nile on a royal, reed, horse- barge.

It is no accident that the barge also mimics a blacksmith’s anvil.
The ‘anvil’ anchors the piece, accentuating its gravitas whilst negating any sense of floatation.

Equuleus   ©

96 cm high x 134 cm wide

Unique

Equuleus (Little Horse) perhaps representing the bringer of war.

This creature is poised for power, seemingly bearing a helmet or plating of some kind - a fearful and ancient deliverance upon some unsuspecting present-day shore.

Diamantopoulo deliberately launches classical or antiquarian themes or forms into the contemporary space in order to provoke.

A thing of beauty can deliver a disturbing sub- text with all the more force.

 

King Creole   ©

87 cm high x 66 cm wide

Unique

Flying over a Norse-like vessel, a Celtic war-horse – simple, like an iron-age chalk downs carving, gallops with a standing rider on board.

The rider is based on the cave scratching of an even earlier art form to become a Neolithic King with an Elvis quiff or a primitive mouth.

The weathervane arms point east and west and echo the Christian cross.

Seahorse   ©

79 cm high x 54 cm wide

Unique

A vessel with a horse-head prow and a horse-legged stand; on board, six rowers of Chinese origin.

Understated in this eclectic mix are the the horsetail rudder and the heart-shaped helmets that are disguised, wind-up toy keys.

This piece implies deception, combining the charm of a mechanical toy with the presence of an instrument of plunder. A variation on a Greek offering.

The Happy Han   ©

74 cm high x 38 cm wide

Unique

“I wanted to simplify the horse form here. The result is easy on the eye – and jolly. Hence the name.”

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